If you have horses, you’ve likely dealt with a wound or two before.

After all, even in the cleanest of pastures, some horses just seem to attract accidents. Of course, with any serious wound, you’ll want to consult your veterinarian, but depending on the location and nature of the wound, sometimes, there’s not much a vet can do.

So how should horse owners deal with an open wound? It can be confusing knowing what to clean or dress it with, if anything at all. 

Some topical treatments such as nitrofurazone, hydrogen peroxide, and iodine-based paints and ointments can actually damage tissues, slowing the healing process instead of helping it. However, several natural remedies are safe and have proven to be effective on equine wounds. These include:

Hydrotherapy

You’ve probably heard it before, but good old water therapy is a great wound treatment; it not only cleans the wound but also increases circulation and stimulates tissue regeneration. It’s important to use cold water as this will help decrease inflammation in the area as well. Vets often recommend at least 20 minutes of hydrotherapy, several times a day.

Tea Tree, Oregano, and Eucalyptus Essential Oils

These three essential oils have been studied and have proven to kill methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Because of this ability, they make great topical treatments for wounds. However, keep in mind that essential oils, especially those placed on wounds, should always be diluted in a carrier oil. You will also want to opt for the 100% therapeutic grade oils.

Bandaging

Bandaging is important for lower leg wounds where proud flesh tends to be an issue; just the act of keeping pressure on a wound can prevent proud flesh and also encourage healing. Applying sterile gauze or foam padding as a base, then use vet wrap to securely wrap the wound. The bandage will need to be removed and the wound irrigated and re-dressed before re-wrapping every 24 hours. 

Honey

Honey (and not just the pricey Manuka honey) has the ability to keep bacteria from growing on wounds. However, this is a remedy you will likely want to use in conjunction with bandaging. Otherwise, you’ll just be attracting dirt and insects!

If you have further suggestions for natural wound remedies, please feel free to share in the comments below!

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Casie Bazay is a freelance and young adult writer, as well as an owner/barefoot trimmer and certified equine acupressure practitioner. She hosts the blog, The Naturally Healthy Horse, where she regularly shares information on barefoot, equine nutrition, and holistic horse health. Once an avid barrel racer, Casie now enjoys just giving back to the horses who have given her so much. Follow Casie at www.casiebazay.com.

Casie Bazay

Casie Bazay is a freelance and young adult writer, as well as an owner/barefoot trimmer and certified equine acupressure practitioner. She hosts the blog, The Naturally Healthy Horse, where she regularly shares information on barefoot, equine nutrition, and holistic horse health. Once an avid barrel racer, Casie now enjoys just giving back to the horses who have given her so much. Follow Casie at www.casiebazay.com.

Casie Bazay

Casie Bazay is a freelance and young adult writer, as well as an owner/barefoot trimmer and certified equine acupressure practitioner. She hosts the blog, The Naturally Healthy Horse, where she regularly shares information on barefoot, equine nutrition, and holistic horse health. Once an avid barrel racer, Casie now enjoys just giving back to the horses who have given her so much. Follow Casie at www.casiebazay.com.

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