We’ve officially entered the hottest part of the year,

 which means we may be seeking air conditioning and ice cream rather than spending long hours at the barn. But while you’re inside, you might consider whipping up some cool treats for your horse. I’m sure they’ll be much appreciated on a hot summer day. Here are a several recipes to try:

Horse Popsicles 

For this recipe, you can use whatever horse-friendly fruits and veggies you have on hand. Examples include: apples, celery, carrots, bananas, watermelon, grapes, lettuce, or squash. 

Directions: Thoroughly wash all your fruits and veggies. Dice them up into small pieces (the smaller the better) or alternatively, you can put them in the blender. Using plastic cups or popsicle molds, add your fruits and veggies, then fill with diluted apple juice, unsweetened applesauce, or water. Freeze overnight and feed the next day (sans cup)!

Frozen Lick Treat 

For a little larger treat which several horses can share, use a bundt cake pan and follow the same directions as above for the Horse Popsicles. You can also add a spoonful of molasses to sweeten it up if you prefer. If you’d like to hang this frozen treat from the fence, simply insert some twine on each edge before you freeze it. This frozen lick treat is sure to keep your horses entertained for a while!

Melon Mint Pops

Another popsicle idea is to use chopped or pureed watermelon or honeydew melon and add in some fresh mint, which is a nice, cooling herb and great to feed in summer. Add melon pieces or puree into popsicle molds or ice cube trays and add a little water, unsweetened applesauce, or diluted apple juice. Freeze overnight and add to your horse’s water bucket or feed these treats by hand.

Ice Water

While this isn’t technically a treat, who doesn’t love refreshing ice cold water on a hot summer day? If it’s a hundred degrees out, chances are your horse’s water bucket or stock tank is filled with lukewarm or even hot water, so add a few cupfuls of ice to encourage drinking and help cool your horse off!

Note: If your horse is insulin resistant or suffers from Equine Metabolic Syndrome, make sure to only feed low sugar treats in moderation. 

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Casie Bazay is a freelance and young adult writer, as well as an owner/barefoot trimmer and certified equine acupressure practitioner. She hosts the blog, The Naturally Healthy Horse, where she regularly shares information on barefoot, equine nutrition, and holistic horse health. Once an avid barrel racer, Casie now enjoys just giving back to the horses who have given her so much. Follow Casie at www.casiebazay.com.

Casie Bazay

Casie Bazay is a freelance and young adult writer, as well as an owner/barefoot trimmer and certified equine acupressure practitioner. She hosts the blog, The Naturally Healthy Horse, where she regularly shares information on barefoot, equine nutrition, and holistic horse health. Once an avid barrel racer, Casie now enjoys just giving back to the horses who have given her so much. Follow Casie at www.casiebazay.com.

July 21, 2020

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